Brazil

South America / Brazil

Brazil Sex Guide advises where to find sex, working girls, prostitution, street hookers, brothels, red-light districts, sex shops, prostitutes, erotic massage parlors, strip clubs, garotas de programa and escorts in Brazil, South America.

WikiSexGuide in Rio de Janeiro

Brazil (Portuguese: Brasil), [1], is the largest country in South America and fifth largest in the world. Famous for its football (soccer) tradition and its annual Carnaval in Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, Recife and Olinda. It is a country of great diversity, from the bustling urban mosaic of São Paulo to the infinite cultural energy of Pernambuco and Bahia, the wilderness of the Amazon rainforest and world-class landmarks such as the Iguaçu Falls, there is plenty to see and to do in Brazil.

Sex Scene and Prostitution

Prostitution itself (exchanging sex for money) in Brazil is legal, as there are no laws forbidding adult prostitution, but it is illegal to operate a brothel or to employ prostitutes in any other way.

Sex tourism exists throughout the country, but it is most apparent in coastal resort towns in the Northeast, South, and Southeast, and in major tourist destinations such as Rio de Janeiro and Fortaleza, Ceara, as well as in the wildlife tourist areas of the Pantanal and Amazon.

Recent reliable estimates on the total number of prostitutes are not available. In the late 1990s, the International Encyclopedia of Sexuality quoted police estimates putting the total number of prostitutes in Brazil at about 1,000,000. In 2002, pressure by the sex worker organization Davida contributed to the Brazilian Ministry of Labor adding "sex worker" to an official list of occupations. Prostitution is not regulated in any way (no mandatory health checks, no licenses are issued etc.), but street prostitutes and call girls can contribute to the official government pension fund and receive benefits when they retire.

According to a poll taken in 1998 (15 years ago), 64% of the population thought prostitution was immoral and should be made illegal, whereas 29% saw it as a job like any other. Fifty nine percent (64% of women) believed that prostitutes do what they do because they like it.

The government's website on prostitution Brazil’s Labor and Employment Ministry Primer on Sex Professional, offering advice for those who wish to become prostitutes, has been the source of controversy, with some accusing the government of encouraging prostitution. The site, among others, teaches prostitutes how to "get an encounter", advising them to "become visually appealing; wait in place (to wait for someone who didn't promise to come); seduce with the look; approach the customer; charm with the voice; seduce with affectionate nicknames; conquer with the touch; involve with perfume; offer the customer specialties; recognize the customer's potential; dance for the customer; dance with the customer; satisfy the customer's ego; praise the customer"[citation needed]

The press reported at the end of 2008 that a government official has announced that the site would be "toned down", following criticism by the media. The law professor Luiz Flavio Gomes has told the O Globo newspaper in its online edition that "What is on the site gives the impression of an apology for sexual exploitation."

The job of a prostitute is called "Professional of sex" and is described as follows: "They [the prostitutes] work on their own initiative, in the street, in bars, night-clubs, hotels, harbor, highways and in garimpos (gold prospecting places). They act in different environments: open air, closed places and inside vehicles, in irregular schedules. In the exercise of some of their activities they can be exposed to vehicles gases, to bad weather, to sound pollution and to social discrimination. There are still risks of getting STD infections, bad-treatment, street violence and death."

It is also stated that: "For the exercise of the profession is required that the workers take part in workshops on safe sex, offered by the category associations. Other complementary courses of professional formation, such as, beauty courses, personal care, budget planning, as well as vocational courses for alternative sources of income also are offered by the associations, in several states. Access to the career is open to those who are 18 or older; the average education is between fourth and seventh grade. Full performance of activities occurs after two years of experience."


See Also: Sex and the FIFA World Cup


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Regions

Brazil is the fifth largest country on earth. It is divided into five regions, mainly drawn around state lines, but they also more or less follow natural, economic and cultural borderlines.

Regions of Brazil
North
Manaus
Northeast
Strong black culture (especially in Bahia) mingles with early Iberic folklore and Indigenous traditions. This is often considered the country's most beautiful coastline, and has the sunniest and hottest climate; but it is also the country's driest and poorest region.
Central West
The Pantanal wetlands, great farms, young cities, the cerrado and the Federal District, with its otherworldly modernist architecture. Birth place of the "sertanejo" music style.
Southeast
The cosmopolitan heart of the country. São Paulo and Rio are the largest cities of the country and its economic and industrial hub; there are also some century-old colonial towns, especially in Minas Gerais.
South
Is a land of valleys and pampas where a strong gaucho culture (shared with Uruguay and Argentina) meets European influences. It has the best standard of living in Brazil with only two large cities (Curitiba and Porto Alegre) and several mid-size cities and rural settlements. Great German, Italian, Polish and Ukrainian took place in the region during the 19th century.

Cities

Brazil has many exciting cities, ranging from pretty colonial towns and coastal hideouts to hectic, lively metropolises; these are a few of the more prominent travel destinations:

  • Brasília - The capital of Brazil, and an architectural spectacle. Noteworthy buildings include a basket-shaped cathedral, the beautiful Arches Palace (seat of the Ministry of Justice) and others.
  • Florianópolis - The city is located in an island in the Atlantic Ocean in the southern state of Santa Catarina, with lakes, lagoons, amazing nature and more than 40 clean, beautiful, natural beaches. Major destination for Argentines during the summer months.
  • Fortaleza -- The fifth biggest city in Brazil, blessed with beautiful beaches. Home of the Iracema Beach street market. A good base for exploring the beaches of the northeastern coast, including Jericoacoara. Famed for forró music and comedians.
  • Manaus - Located in the heart of the Amazon, is the capital of Amazonas State and it is also the biggest city of the Amazon. At Manaus the rivers Negro and Solimões meet to became the Amazonas River. The best place to go to visit the Amazon rainforest. It is a gateway to the Anavilhanas and to Jaú National Park.
  • Porto Alegre-- a major city between Argentina and São Paulo and gateway to Brazil's fabulous Green Canyons.
  • Recife - A major city in the Northeast region, originally settled by Dutch colonizers. Nicknamed "The Brazilian Venice", it is built on several islands linked by many bridges. Rich in history, art and folklore. Do not miss neighboring Olinda and Porto de Galinhas. The city is also a gateway to the amazing archipelago of Fernando de Noronha.
  • Rio de Janeiro - World famous, beautiful city that welcomes visitors with that big statue of an open-armed Jesus atop Corcovado Hill.
  • Salvador - The first capital of Brazil is home to a unique blend of indigenous, African and European cultures. Its Carnival fun is famous, and the influence of African culture and religion is remarkable.
  • São Paulo - Brazil's largest, richest and most cosmopolitan city, where you can find strong influences of several ethnicities, including Italian, Korean, Japanese, German, Russian, Caribbean, Greek and Arab.
  • Tubarão - is the main city of the Tubarão River basin region, which comprises 20 municipalities and a population of 350,000 inhabitants.

Other cities also attract a good deal of travelers

  • Belo Horizonte - Capital of Minas Gerais, is a convenient starting point to explore the state's colonial past.
  • Búzios -- Trendy seaside town with 25 beaches. 192 km north of Rio.
  • Campo Grande -- Very green and many parks.
  • Campos do Jordão -- A European-style city, in the state of São Paulo. It's famous for its fresh climate and the Winter Classical Music Festival.
  • Corumbá -- "Capital" of Pantanal.
  • Cuiabá -- The major gateway to Pantanal, near several beautiful places like: Chapada dos Guimarães with it's water fall "Véu de noiva", Curvelandia's caves and rivers, fishing in Barão de Melgaço.
  • Gramado -- A very beautiful Germanic city in the highlands of Rio Grande do Sul, known for its wonderful "Natal Luz" (The Christmas-Light), the most impressive Christmas festival of the Latin America. It's also known for the Film Festival.
  • João Pessoa -- The easternmost Brazilian city, where the sun rises first. Nicknamed "Jardim das Acácias" (Acacia Garden), rather unexplored, with a warm climate, good-hearted people and beautiful beaches.
  • Maceió -- One of the many northeastern coastal cities, with Caribbean-blue beaches.
  • Natal -- Sunny beaches and dunes. Has the reputation of being the sunniest Brazilian city.
  • Olinda -- A colonial town, popular for its culture and arts scene and a Carnival that rivals those of Rio and Salvador. Listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO due to its XVI and XVII-century buildings.
  • Ouro Preto -- Another colonial town, with the largest sample of the baroque art in Latin America. It was once the financial center of Brazil, during the gold rush. The entire city is part of the World Heritage Site by UNESCO.
  • Penedo -- A small town in the state of Rio de Janeiro, near the border with São Paulo. The city was settled by Finns and both languages - Finnish and Portuguese - are spoken in this city.
  • Porto Alegre -- An urban destination in Brazil's southernmost state of Rio Grande do Sul. Has a very active nightlife.
  • São Luís -- Founded by the French in the 17th century and soon taken over by Portuguese forces after a quick Dutch occupation, São Luis is a fascinating town that managed to preserve its Portuguese influenced colonial buildings and is also known for its rich popular culture. The island also share cultural similarities with Jamaica and is known as the Brazilian reggae capital.
  • Vitória -- Midway between Rio and Salvador, it is a beautiful city between the mountains and the ocean.
  • Taquarussu -- Located in the hills near Palmas (Tocantins) it's famous for its waterfalls.-->

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Dating

Dating in Brazil can be a bit tricky due to cultural differences, so your best bet is to sign up for a dating site before your trip so you can meet a few locals ahead of time. AdultFriendFinder.com lets you meet local members in Brazil and get to know them on a personal basis before you arrive. Take advantage of site features like live chat and member to member webcams so you can begin flirting before arranging a face-to-face meeting. Since your time in Brazil may be limited, get to know each other’s desires beforehand, so that when you meet you can start having some real fun.

Gay & Lesbian

Due to its high degree of acceptance and tolerance, gay travel is increasingly popular. Brazil hosted the first gay ball in America in 1754! Nowadays the main lesbian and gay destinations are Rio, which was elected the world's sexiest destination twice, São Paulo, which has the world's largest Pride Parade, Florianópolis, which is the hippest gay hangout and Recife which is attracting more and more lesbian and gay tourists looking for fun and sun.

Rank City Percentage
of City
Population
GLB

Population

rank
1 Rio de Janeiro 14.30% 1
2 Fortaleza 8.35% 3
3 Manaus 8.35% 4
4 São Paulo 8.20% 2
5 Salvador 8.05% 5
6 Brasilia 7.95% 6
7 Belo Horizonte 6.85% 7
8 Curitiba 6.55% 8
9 Porto Alegre 5.95% 9
10 Cuiabá 5.65% 10

Brazil is open to LGBT tourists. São Paulo boasts the biggest LGBT Pride parade in the world, and most major cities will have gay scenes. However, be aware that homophobia is widespread in Brazilian society, and Brazil is not the sexual haven that many foreigners perceive it to be. Couples that in any way don't conform to traditional heterosexual expectations should expect to be open to some verbal harassment and stares if displaying affection in the streets, though several neighborhoods of many of the major cities are very welcoming of the LGBT population, and LGBT-oriented bars and clubs are common. It is best to gather information from locals as to what areas are more conservative and what areas are more progressive.

Stay safe

By law, everyone must carry a photo ID at all times. For a foreigner, this means your passport. However, the police will mostly be pragmatic and accept a plastified color photocopy.

Even the most patriotic Brazilian would say that the greatest problem the country faces is crime. Brazil is one of the most criminalised countries of the world, therefore the crime rate is high, even for a developing nation. Armed bandits have more recently been attacking schools, hotels and even innocent people in the streets. While in recent years, the overall crime levels are steadily decreasing, Brazil continues to have moderately high crime rates in various aspects, even with a moderate homicide rate (about 28 per 100,000 people). Of significant concern is that policemen may not always provide the best quality of assistance and even be more dangerous than the criminals itself. Lack of man power, low wages and inappropriate training contribute to a lack of professionalism.

The best thing to do is to not act like a tourist, and do not display items of extreme wealth such as laptops, jewelry, etc. Also avoid carrying large amounts of money with you.

Although Brazil is widely known as a country where sex is freely available, it is sometimes misunderstood regarding HIV. Brazil has one of the best HIV prevention programs and consequently, a very low infection rate compared with most countries. Condoms are highly encouraged by governmental campaigns during carnival, and distributed for free by local public medical departments.

In 2003, it was estimated that about 6% of Brazilian prostitutes were infected with HIV. Gabriela Silva Leite, the executive director of Prostitution Civil Rights, says that because of information campaigns, condom use among prostitutes is high.

The Brazilian government turned down $40 million in U.S. anti-HIV/AIDS funding in 2005, because the U.S. government required all recipients to sign an anti-prostitution pledge. The Brazilian anti-AIDS program employs prostitutes to hand out information and free condoms; Brazil's AIDS commissioner Pedro Chequer was quoted as saying "Sex workers are part of implementing our AIDS policy and deciding how to promote it. They are our partners. How could we ask prostitutes to take a position against themselves?" A Washington Post article stated that the Brazilian anti-AIDS program is considered by the United Nations to be the most successful in the developing world.

See Also

More Cities in Brazil

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