Dar es Salaam

From Wikisexguide
Jump to: navigation, search
The Bank of Tanzania at dawn

Dar es Salaam Sex Guide advises where to find sex, working girls, prostitution, street hookers, brothels, red-light districts, prostitutes, erotic massage parlors, strip clubs and escorts in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Dar es Salaam (Haven of Peace in Arabic) was founded in 1862 by Sultan Seyyid Majid of Zanzibar on the site of the village of Mzizima. Mzizima's history dates back to the time when the Barawa people started to settle and cultivate the area around Mbwa Maji, Magogoni, Mjimwema, Gezaulole and Kibonde Maji Mbagara.

Sex Scene and Prostitution

Prostitution in Tanzania is illegal under Tanzanian law, but it is still widespread.

Some of the Dar es Salaam prostitues are sex workers at day time and housewives at the night time. They come back home from sex work just before their husbands get back from their jobs.

Red Light Districts

If Uwanja wa Fisi is said to be the reduced-price and dodgy red light district of Dar es Salaam, then those prostitutes who operate in the Uwanja wa fisi pubs and restaurants are said to be even cheaper than the rest and usually prefer beer or a meal as payment for their services. Often they are so far gone, that when they are seriously drunk or high, they have sex with more than two partners unconsciously.

Prostitutes

If you are not afraid try the graveyards of Dar es Salaam.

The eerie silence, solitude and darkness of graveyards make them a virtual no-go area for most people, but they're the perfect venue for sex workers and prostitutes in Tanzania's capital, Dar es Salaam.

"Every evening after sunset cemeteries teem with hordes of couples jostling for space between graves to fuck. Burial grounds not only allow privacy but no room rent needed, making commercial sex common in the more than 30 cemeteries that the city of about four million. But the graveyards are far from shops where condoms are sold and there is concern among activists that cemetery sex is stoking the spread of HIV/AIDS, which affects nearly seven percent of the country's population.

Street Hookers

All the restaurants and bars on the beach like QBar, Maisha, Coco Beach, Runway Disco Mekocheni and many others are packed of girls inside and outside. The Tanzanian street hookers are really easy to find they are everywhere.

Strip Clubs

Strip Clubs in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

  • Balcony Strip Club- Dar Es Salaam (Mtendeni), Dar Es Salaam 00255

If you looking for something different and fun, so try this out. Finally there is semi strip club of Dar es Salaam Tanzania. But this is not your ordinary strip club like they have in the developed world. Club Continental offers this show and its more of the same show and the same clothing, every week. It is always on wednesday and it is more like cultural thing than a horny strip show.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klMUOPAZyrI#t=281

Brothels

In Dar es Salaam is the existence of illegal brothels run by Chinese entrepreneurs and also local Tanzanians. Apparently they have both Chinese and Tanzanian girls “on display. It is a new phenomenon that Chinese prostitutes a extensively found. There is a lot of brothels around city and the beach. All the touristic areas have so called brothels. Remember night time it's a bit unsafe so try to leave before dark or ask the girl or bartender to arrange a cab in front the brothel.

Erotic Massage Parlors

Touristic areas in Dar es Salaam are full of Massage Parlors. most of the places offers you BJ's, HJ's and they also go all the way. Mostly they try to force you for extra services.

Transsexuals / Shemales

Hard to find Tee-girls in whole Tanzania.

Gay & Lesbian

Homosexuality in Tanzania is a socially taboo topic, and same-sex sexual acts are crimes punishable by the state.

Sexual Services for Women

There are a huge number of night clubs, bars and pubs where women can easily find a male company for the night for free.

Sex Shops & Adult Stores

Most pharmacies in Dar es Salaam will sell Viagra, Kamagra and Cialis without prescription. Some street hustlers will also sell some potency medicines, but you can never be sure if they are legit or not.

Escort Services & Agencies

you'll find a lot of escorts in Dar es Salaam online.

Sleeping

You can bring to most of the hotels your companion, if you just agree with your receptionist before paying your room.

Q-bar is great place to stay. Weekdays there are always some women around, but especially on friday night there are lots more men than women. Many girls who are willing to be a prostitute for a chance. Location: Q-Bar & Guest House (Off Haile Selassie Road, Plot 1, Dar es Salaam 4595, Tanzania)

Stay safe

Tanzania is one of the least policed countries in the world. Rapes and murders often go unreported and little data exists to suggest how common these crimes are. Domestic violence and sexual harassment, which often goes well beyond verbal cat-calling, are extremely common. Foreign female students have documented multiple accounts of sexual assualt and/or rape. These cases often go unreported/under-reported by universities with study abroad programs in Tanzania, and of course by the Tanzanian authorities themselves. Walking alone at night outside the most exclusive areas (think Oyster Bay, the Slipway, Sea Cliff, etc.) is extremely inadvisable for foreigners. Men stand a high chance of being mugged, women of being mugged and/or sexually assaulted. Dar is often very poorly lit. The city experiences a great many power outages. This makes lone women particularly vulnerable.

Most travelers who are in Dar on a short stay will, fortunately, not face these challenges. Similarly, most expatriates who live in Dar are sequestered well enough (with cars, security guards, in upscale neighborhoods, etc.) not to have to worry about this sort of thing.

By far the most common crimes, and the biggest risk for most travelers, will be muggings and petty thefts. Muggings occur very frequently, including sometimes on the street in broad daylight. Sometimes, but not always, the victim gets roughed up. Foreign students at the University of Dar es Salaam have been mugged at machete point. Never carry your wallet anywhere easily accessible (a back pocket, an outside flap of a backpack or purse, etc.).

Avoid in particular:

- walking on the beach (like Cocoa Beach) while carrying valuables, as many of these places are invisible from the road. Dar can be a friendly place, and you can certainly have an enjoyable visit there, but avoid carrying valuables as you may draw problems. You can walk in the city in the evening but as it gets darker and you see fewer people on the street, take the hint and exercise caution. It might be better to take a taxi. If you are noticeably foreign, remember that many people will assume you have valuables and may be an easy target.

- Parking in dark sectors of the beach is a bad idea as thieves and junkies crouch in the dark waiting for the unaware foreigner to park, turn-off the engine and leave the car (to have a nice view of the Dar night from the beach) which be stolen or have valuables stolen by a waiting unseen groups - in the case of a male foreigner- or assault and steal in the case of a female foreigner. For a female foreigner, this is an absolute Not To Do.

Parking in a place without a guard creates the serious risk of having lights or other car parts extracted. It is not uncommon for people to try to steal things through open windows, while you are waiting for lights to change, or to open unlocked doors and either get in or swipe something! Some people have had passersby attempt to snatch purses off their laps while sitting in the back of a taxi at an intersection.

There is a major police station at Selendar Bridge on Ocean Road and other police posts in various other places. If you don't follow the driving rules (or sometimes even if you do) you will spend time and money, either discussing with them their price or more formally in the police station. Police here ask for lifts regularly to get places but you are not obliged to take them if you feel uncomfortable. There is a great deal of corruption in Tanzania. Skin color, bribes, and connections to known elites in town still, unfortunately, hold a lot of sway.

A number of visitors have reported being pickpocketed in crowds at the Posta daladala stand recently (2009). If you're walking past this it's best to cross the road to avoid the crowd. If you're getting a daladala be aware of your possessions, be particularly aware of people stopping suddenly in front of you - this is sometimes done to block you in while someone behind you goes through your bags. Other well known pickpocket sites are the ferry to Kigamboni (nb. not the Zanzibar ferry), the Mnazi Mmoja dala stand, the trinket stalls on Samora Av and Karriakoo Market. There's no reason to avoid these areas just be aware of your possessions when you are there, particularly bags. Using razor blades to cut into bags to remove items is quite common - and really annoying.

If you are robbed, you have a few options. None of them are good. You can yell, "mwizi!" This means 'thief' in Swahili. If you do this in a crowded place, you will very likely incite a mob to form. The mob might corner the thief and detain him until the police arrive. They might also beat up the thief very badly, possibly to the point of death. Theft carries huge risks in a culture where people possess very few material goods. The social punishments for stealing can be brutal beatings or, in some cases, death. Weigh the worth of your $40 cell phone or purse against the potential results of fomenting a stir. If you are in a crowded place (like the downtown Posta daladala stand, for example), you will, at the very least, create a gigantic scene, probably cause someone to be beaten, and have to spend a day dealing with the Dar es Salaam police department in sweltering, inefficient conditions. Much more practical just to exercise extreme care with how you carry your belongings, and to avoid carrying valuables (i.e. anything you can't afford to lose) altogether.

Be careful when taking taxis at night, particularly if you are alone, where possible use a driver you know or ask someone to call a taxi for you. If staying in Dar for an extended period of time, try to get the phone numbers of the first fair, seemingly trustworthy cabbies you encounter. Keep using them. If you are living in Dar without a car, this will greatly increase your safety. Taking buses at night and walking in poorly lit areas alone or in small groups (particularly of women, noticeable foreigners, or other people who might look like 'easy targets') is a great way to increase the risk of something bad happening (mugging, rape, etc.). Split taxis when possible. Some travelers have narrowly escaped potentially violent muggings and/or rape and others were not so fortunate.

Remember that, generally speaking, the more you stand out, the higher your risk factor will be. It is possible to have a wonderful time in Dar, if you make yourself aware of these risks and adapt accordingly. Guide books neglect a great deal of this common sense information when it comes to Tanzania.

See Also